Suchindram Temple is unique in the whole of India in that it is dedicated to three different deities represented by one image in the sanctum and is called Sthanumalayan (Sthanu-Shiva, Maal-Vishnu and Ayan-Brahma) kovil. The temple is rich in sculpture and architecture and a visitor to this temple is amply rewarded with the sight of such exquisite art of hundreds of years old. There are Many Legends associated with the temple and one of the stories mentioned is, Once Indra was infatuated with Ahalya, the wife of Rishi Gautama. One night he came to the hermitage where Gautama was living and crowed like a cock indicating the approach of dawn. Rishi Gautama thinking that dawn was imminent awoke from his sleep and went to the river for his ablutions prior to commencing his prayers. Realising that it was too dark for dawn and too early for morning to break he returned to his hut. In the meantime Lord Indra took the physical appearance of Rishi Gautama, approached Ahalya and satisfied his desire. Rishi Gautama returning from the river was enraged when he saw his wife in another man´s embrace and cursed the man’s entire body be covered with ‘yoni’ (the female organ) and his wife Ahalya to become a statue of stone. Lord Indra in order to get rid of this curse went to Gnanaranya and prayed to the Three Moorthys to rid him of this curse. When he was rid of his curse and transformed into his original form he built a temple and installed the Lingam to represent the three Moorthy – Thanu-Maal-Ayan, and the name of the place came to be known as Suchi-Indran (the place where Indiran was purified). The temple has quite a few sculptures and art. In the ‘Alankara mandapam’ adjacent to the Northern corridor there are four large pillars each formed by a group of smaller pillars all carved from a single stone. Two of these large pillars have 33 smaller pillars and the other two 25 each. These are the famous musical pillars. Each of these smaller pillars produces a different musical note when tapped. Unfortunately these pillars are surrounded by iron grills to prevent vandalism. A step out of the ‘Alankara mandapam’ and you come face to face with a gigantic figure of Hanuman. The figure is 18 feet high and depicts ‘visuvaroopam’. There are other carvings and sculptures on every pillar and panel throughout the temple, which are a feast to the eye and the imagination. The town along with Kanyakumari was part of Travancore. It became part of Tamil Nadu in 1956. The place is not far from Kolachel where the historic naval battle between the Dutch and Travancore was fought.